International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers

Today is the International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers. CIOR and NATO celebrates the anniversary together with the United Nations. The theme this year is  ‘Women in peacekeeping: A Key to Peace’.

“The International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers, 29 May, offers a chance to pay tribute to the uniformed and civilian personnel’s invaluable contribution to the work of the Organisation and to honour more than 3,900 peacekeepers who have lost their lives serving under the UN flag since 1948, including 102 last year.

This year, the challenges and threats faced by UN peacekeepers are even greater than ever, as they, like people around the world, are not only having to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic, but also support and protect the people in the countries they are based in. They are continuing their operations to the best of their abilities and supporting the governments and the local populations,  despite the risk of COVID-19.

The theme for this year’s Day is “Women in Peacekeeping: A Key to Peace” to help mark the 20th anniversary of the adoption of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security.” (Source: UN website)

Read more @ https://www.un.org/en/observances/peacekeepers-day

 

 

China: Future Threat or Partner? Experts and Reservists Discuss Security Politics at the CIOR 2020 seminar

(This article was first published in Dutch military science magazine Military Spectator’s  April edition.)

Since he came to power, President Xi Jinping has put China on the road toward a certain destiny. Central to the country’s economic, diplomatic and military initiatives, experts agree, stands the survival of the Communist Party. That party envisions a new, multipolar world order, in which China dominates its own hemisphere. What does the rise of China mean for NATO and the Armed Forces of the member states? At the February 2020 seminar of the Interallied Confederation of Reserve Officers (CIOR) in Bonn, Germany, experts elaborate on various topics concerning security, economic and cultural issues involving China. Is China, as the seminar’s title suggests, a future threat or partner, or is there still another angle to the debate?

By: Frans van Nijnatten

Underpinned by an unprecedented economic growth, China is building up the People’s Liberation Army and wants to play an influential role in military-strategic matters in Asia. Photo: Amber Smith/ US Army.

At the kick-off of the seminar in a packed conference room of the Gustav Stresemann Institute Lieutenant Colonel (R) Hans Garrels, Chairman of CIOR’s Seminar Committee, wants to see a show of hands from the participants: who, based on the knowledge he or she has now, is convinced China is a threat, who considers it a possible partner? The votes are roughly equally divided, with the majority of the reservists from CIOR members and associate countries attending eagerly conceding they are not experts on the matter. They see the congress as an excellent opportunity to inform themselves about a current topic in world affairs. Towards the end of the four-day meeting it is expected that at least some will have adjusted their opinions.

In his introduction Philippe Welti, former Swiss ambassador to Iran and India and an expert
on geopolitical and strategic affairs, explains China’s position in the regional and global environment. There is no doubt that China, underpinned by the unprecedented economic growth of the past decades, is building up the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) and wants to play an influential role in military-strategic matters in Asia, partly by outspending rivals Russia, India and Japan. Experts agree that the Chinese defence budget has grown steadily over the last twenty years, and economic growth has allowed the country to modernize its army (including the nuclear forces) and develop blue water naval capabilities. By the mid-2020s, China will have at least three aircraft carriers and a considerable submarine force, allowing it to undertake force projection in vast parts of the Asia-Pacific region. Besides other major military reforms that have been initiated there has been a flattening of the command structure combined with the strengthening of the party’s dominance over the military.

Beijing considers the U.S. to be a military competitor it has to erode and surpass, since no other country seems to be able to frustrate China’s long-term strategic objectives. Gradually, the PLA which, according to the Chinese government, had a budget of almost 178 billion dollars in 2019, is growing into a much more lethal military organization, with a considerable role for reservists and a better ability to perform joint operations.

Strategic opportunity

China, according to Dr. Christopher D. Yung, Dean of the US Marine Corps War College, recognizes a period of ‘strategic opportunity’ in which a relatively peaceful international environment allows it to expand its own military power and – through diplomatic pressure – to reform the international political system and agreements (United Nations, World Bank, cyber laws, the space and maritime domains, et cetera) so that they better suit the needs of authoritarian regimes.

Dr. Oliver Corff, a specialist on China’s current affairs, says observers can derive clues to a Chinese grand strategy from official party decisions, five-year planning documents, yearly government reports, white papers and ad hoc programmatic speeches by party leaders. Considering itself the ‘infallible executioner of history’, the party seems to aim at making China the one dominant economic and military player in the region, exporting its own security model to neighbouring countries. To the outside world, China communicates a strategic narrative that conveys clear and diffuse messages at the same time. As an information source, therefore, Chinese media should be handled very carefully.

At the same time, China has a fragile political system and still spends more on internal security than on defence, because the Communist Party wants to retain its absolute grip on power. Internal unrest, economic downturns and unexpected crises, like the outbreak of the coronavirus, continue to test the party’s resolve. At the same time, the regime spends vast sums on programmes to restrain internet access for its 1.3 billion people, says John Lee of the Mercator Institute for China Studies. China’s digital espionage force, fitting a hybrid warfare philosophy, and its aspiration to become a cyber super power are just one side of the coin; using the internet for total domestic control, enhanced by initiatives like the social credit system, is the other.

Discussing China’s role at the Bonn seminar: Dr. Christopher D. Yung (foreground) eleborates on the ‘strategic opportunity’ the Chinese Communist Party has recognized. Photo: LtCol Bill Grieve (R), US Army/ CIOR Public Affairs.

Taiwan and the South China Sea

To keep its own people rallied around the country’s interests, the party, among others, constantly depicts security threats from the outside. It points at Taiwan, the East and South China Sea, South Korea, and the risk of a cyber attack from overseas. Dr. Sarah Kirchberger of the Institute for Security Politics at Kiel University reminds the audience that in the case of Taiwan, China applies an ‘anaconda strategy’, aimed at ‘suffocating’ the island by military, economic and diplomatic pressure and cyber attacks. She poses an intriguing question: what would the reaction of NATO be if China really attacked the island? Would the member states stand united and if not and only the U.S. stood by Taiwan, could it spell the end of the Alliance? China, she stresses, invests heavily in Anti-Access and Area Denial (A2AD) capacities, while the PLA runs joint invasion scenarios during exercises.

Beijing’s political-military strategy envisions not only the eventual taking of Taiwan and expanding sovereign maritime rights, but also the undertaking of out-of-area operations, aimed at the protection of overseas markets and other interests, like the military base operated by China in Djibouti in East Africa. Elsewhere on the continent China has been making inroads as well. Dr. Andreas Wolfrum, an expert on Chinese culture, explains that African nations are particularly susceptible to offers from Beijing because they hope they can somehow follow the example of China, which after the Communist takeover in 1949 was an underdeveloped country itself but is now, due to its policy of ‘catch up and overtake’, a player on the international scene. Not only in Africa, but also in Asia and Europe, China has gained foothold in markets – well-known examples being Huawei and 5G – and other sectors through the so-called Belt and Road Initiative it started in 2013. In the long run, however, accepting Chinese investments and loans may be subject to a quid pro quo with countries running the risk of Beijing ultimately demanding payback. Eventually, this could become a security threat and put alliances under pressure.

Bilateral meeting between NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg and Zhang Ming, Ambassador of China to the European Union. Photo: NATO.

Since Xi became President in 2013, China has been using its foreign policy on a broader scale to influence other countries. In foreign affairs, China cooperates with the U.S. on certain issues, but tries to upset Washington on others. One of those areas is the South China Sea, where Beijing operates in a provocative way, claiming historical rights it has unilaterally written into law. Bill Hayton, journalist for BBC News and author of the book The South China Sea. Dangerous Ground, explains that China considers itself the rightful owner of the area which, because of its fishing grounds and natural resources, is of economic importance. The dispute revolves not only around existing islands or artificial ones constructed by China; it also has everything to do with China’s demand for access to the open sea for its navy and especially its SLBM-equipped submarines.

China seeks cooperation with countries that challenge the international status quo, such
as Russia and Iran, and tries to weaken ties between the U.S. and its most loyal ally in the region, Japan. Japan, the U.S, Australia and India have responded by founding the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue, creating a multilateral platform for talks and combined military exercises. Another reaction has been the 2018 renaming of the U.S. Pacific Command into Indo-Pacific Command, to broaden the focus on an intertwined area where China wants to become the dominant factor.

Synergy with Russia

Dr. Lyle J. Goldstein points seminar participants at the growing military-strategic cooperation between China and Russia. Photo: LtCol Bill Grieve (R), US Army/ CIOR Public Affairs.

China not necessarily wants to go it alone. Dr. Lyle J. Goldstein, Research Professor in the China Maritime Studies Institute of the U.S. Naval War College, emphasizes the synergy China and Russia have developed in several important fields, ranging from trade to military matters. In an article for The National Interest, published during the Bonn seminar, Goldstein points at the strain Russia caused by closing major border crossings in the Far East due to the coronavirus crisis in China. It should be just a temporary setback, though. Only recently, Russian President Vladimir Putin has announced that his country is helping China to create a missile attack warning system, which clearly shows a growing military-strategic cooperation between Moscow and Beijing. During a workshop, Goldstein challenged seminar participants to dwell on this rapprochement and the implica- tions for NATO. Would it be realistic to expect a concerted military effort by both countries in the near future, with China, for example, attacking Taiwan and Russia simultaneously creating a conflict elsewhere? Should the West ‘up its game’ by using a wedge strategy, aiming at driving Russia and China apart? At a time when many NATO countries seem to distrust both Russia and China, there seems to be no easy solution.

Ships from the Indian Navy, Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force and the U.S. Navy sail in formation as part of Malabar 2017 in the Bay of Bengal, a combined exercise to address the threats to maritime security in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. Photo: Holly Herline, US Navy.

In order to create nearby stability, China is expanding its political and military presence along its periphery and adjacent areas, but is currently not a real enemy, says Dr. Yung. He calls a short-term military confrontation in which the U.S. and other NATO countries would be involved, a far-fetched idea. At this moment, China would be at the losing end of such a conflict and the government in Beijing realizes that. It leaves him to conclude that instead of being either a threat to NATO or a possible partner, China should primarily be considered a challenge, especially to U.S. foreign policy. For participants in Bonn, many of them eager to follow the debate on China from now on more closely, that is one of the valuable insights to take away from the reservists’ seminar.

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‘Armed Forces and CIOR should focus on the younger generation’

Hans Garrels on the need for reservists and their ideas.

In 2019 the Dutch Armed Forces welcomed 564 new reservists, to bring the total to almost 5,800. The growth in the number of reservists is good news, but the Ministry could still step up its efforts to facilitate part-time military personnel in consultation with their civilian employers, says LtCol (R) Hans Garrels, Chairman of the Seminar Committee of the Interallied Confederation of Reserve Officers (CIOR). After a day of presentations and discussions about China and NATO at the yearly seminar in Bonn, Germany, Garrels expresses his views to the Militaire Spectator about the need to stimulate young people to become reservists and, as such, help determine the future of the armed forces. According to Garrels, reservists should not shy away from taking part in complex debates on international and security politics.

By: Frans van Nijnatten

‘Compared to other countries, I would describe the recognition of the position of reservists in the Netherlands as rather poor.’ Garrels, who works as an independent business consultant and is Deputy Head of Reservists at the Defence Materiel Organisation, chooses his words carefully. ‘For example, the Bundeswehr has a reservist or, as the case may be, replacement for almost all functional ranks, up to the highest level. In the UK, the General Staff has reservists at two and three star level. The same applies to France.’ In those countries, reservists apparently are not considered a ‘threat’ by the regular military. Garrels: ‘But I do not know of one Dutch reservist who intends to take over the position of his professional colleague.’

Hans Garrels: ‘Every reservist who has a certain position or ambition, should want to participate in the seminar to develop a broader understanding of global security issues and international decision-making’. Photo: 2nd Lt Catalin Florea, Romanian Air Force/ CIOR Public Affairs.

Garrels calls the influx of new reservists good news, but says a considerable effort should be made to make sure they do not leave after only a short stint. ‘In some fields, we are starting to run into shortages of, for example nurses, engineers, and members of the National Reserve Corps. We see many students who join the National Reserve, which

is a nice part-time job. Some of those people are really talented and ambitious, some play an important role in filling gaps that are the result of the many vacancies within the Dutch Armed Forces. But we keep cutting the budget for reservists too quickly, while at the same time we expect them to attend the required exercises and stay available. The Ministry should really apply better personnel care because if the militarywishes to include reservists in their organization, it is also responsible for them. And why not develop a career policy for them?’

New initiatives needed

As a representative of the independent Dutch reservists’ associaton KVNRO Garrels emphasizes that the organization does not seek ‘to judge the world of professional soldiers.’ Nevertheless, the Ministry should not be afraid of suggestions made by people employed outside the military. ‘With a few exceptions, criticism usually comes from people who want to make an organization better. An organization must be willing to learn.’

‘When those responsible within the Dutch Armed Forces look at trends in society, they will realize that the young people we need nowadays cannot be lured with outdated employment contracts. We will have to seduce them by offering custom-made agreements and new incentives. The blind loyalty to one’s employer is a thing of the past. Nowadays, young people switch jobs more easily. So, why not introduce, as a replacement for the conscription we have put on hold, the right to serve? Unfortunately, this is not currently being discussed, and from the viewpoint of the organization there’s a big question hovering over this idea: is it manageable?’

To keep up the operational level of ambition the Armed Forces have set for themselves, new initiatives to attract reservists will come up, Garrels expects. ‘We cannot sit back and wait for young people, we will have to take action ourselves, simply because we need their knowledge.’

CIOR aims at young reservists

Garrels, himself a keen watcher of international affairs, enthousiastically tells about the organizational work needed to hold the yearly CIOR Bonn seminar. ‘We offer a platform for scientific debate on a current geopolitical- military topic, with highly-qualified speakers who influence discussions in the media and via books and articles. I think every reservist who has a certain position or ambition, should want to participate to develop a broader understanding of global security issues and international decision-making.’ Meanwhile the CIOR, too, has shifted its attention to the younger generation. ‘It became clear tous that we had to leave Cold War thinking behind us. We had to look at the CIOR and reservists differently than in the context of large mobile units and traditional military operations.’

Bringing young reservists to the seminar is one of Garrels’s top priorities. ‘The CIOR narrative, communicated by its Public Affairs Committee, is very good, but we have to get the message across to the young. We will sit together soon with some of their representatives to discuss some ideas, like a social media strategy.’ Pushing news through social media channels is one of the recommendations 34-year- old Captain Reitze Wellen (Royal Netherlands Army) makes. ‘The CIOR and KNVRO should make the information available as soon as possible, to allow those interested to make arrangements with their civil employers. Many young reservists would like to attend the seminar, if they only knew it existed.’

Without exception, the young people attending the conference say they find it enriching. ‘The seminar is an opportunity to meet collegues from other NATO countries and learn about their culture,’ says Wellen. ‘Normally, we consider the issues from an operational and tactical point of view. Experts at the seminar, however, zoom in on strategic developments and challenge participants to express their own thoughts.’ Lieutenant Desi van de Laar (33, Royal Netherlands Air Force) agrees with Wellen and appreciates the seminar as a platform to talk about current topics with collegues from abroad, like a reservist from Australia who has been involved in operations to fight the devastating fires that recently swept the country.

Besides the seminar, reservists can take part in CIOR programmes aimed at sharpening skills and knowledge. Photo: 2nd Lt Catalin Florea, Romanian Air Force/ CIOR Public Affairs.

Garrels: ‘Young reservists gain international contacts and insight into international decision-making. The CIOR is a versatile organization, which has attractive programmes
to offer, like the Young Reserve Officers Workshop and its own Language Academy. These programmes are discussed during the seminars as well.’ Van de Laar describes the additional value these programmes have for her: ‘They enhance both skills and knowledge and create abilities you can use directly in your job.’

Garrels urges participants from as many CIOR member countries as possible to take part in the seminar, also to avoid one-sided views and to broaden the scope of the academic debate. At the end of each seminar, he gathers the evaluation forms participants have filled out. There is always room for improvement but Garrels’s starting point will remain signing on first-rate speakers whose views
will help sharpen reservists’ opinions. ‘Armed Forces give young people a lot of responsibility. They learn to lead, persevere, and make difficult decisions and support them. On a broader scale, those qualities play a role in global security politics as well and that is exactly why reservists have a headstart when contemplating military and international affairs.’

(This article was first published in Dutch military science magazine Military Spectator’s  April edition.)

Young Reserve Officers attending Seminar: Enables independent Thinking, more objective View and Understanding

The CIOR Seminar last week on ‘China, Threat or Opportunity?’ was a great success, judged by statements from participants. Here are some perspectives from the Junior Ranks that took part in this year’s edition of the annual event.

By: Roy Thorvaldsen, Lt Col (R) Norwegian Army/ CIOR Public Affairs

(The) Conceptual study enables independent thinking and a more objective view and understanding. I’m currently undertaking an MA in Conflict Resolution at King’s College London as it’s far too easy to succumb to military groupthink.

China as the next great threat is the buzz phrase of the moment, especially at NATO events. I found it very refreshing that the CIOR Seminar provided a much more unbiased take on the Chinese threat to global security.

A briefing on the strategic importance of access to deep waters for ballistic submarines was enlightening when assessing the territorial dispute between People’s Republic of China and Taiwan. Dr Yung’s lecture was the highlight for me, analysing not just Chinese defence numbers but the actual distribution and defence capability, which, coupled with China’s intent, led to some very eye opening conclusions.

Has NATO been too quick to label China as a global foe? From the UK perspective, possibly so. However the US is the cornerstone of NATO and as Dr Kirchberger questioned if NATO doesn’t support US interests, how committed would the US be to NATO?

I shall combine this learning with my academic study to continue furthering my awareness and stimulating my thinking.

Lt Sarah George, 30, United Kingdom, Army

-Extremely mind-opening

“Overall this seminar has been extremely mind-opening. The fact that there are officers from 13 different countries is huge. I learned a lot about their countries, culture and military side as well.

The seminar was  organised very well, all the speakers are very professional and know what they are talking about. The topic is very interesting and learning about China’s culture gives me as a young officer from a small country a bigger picture about what really is going on in the world.

Even though we are a small country we are still affected by China’s actions and the fact that there is also going on a future alliance between China and Russia would affect the Baltic significantly. I have made a lot of new contacts and I would not trade this experience for anything.”

Ensign Valmar Alve, Estonia

– Learned more about perspectives, values, and concerns

I attended both the MWM and the Seminar for the first time this year. I found the sessions at the Seminar to be extremely valuable. The panelists were uniformly knowledgable, and were able to communicate their expertise to a generalist audience. 

The discussion helped me learn more about the perspectives, values, and concerns from allied countries, particularly where vested business interests functionally restrict national policy – such as Huawei’s embedding itself in Europe, and American companies’ need for access to the Chinese market to fund R&D.

Equally, if not more valuable, was the ability to interact with officers from across the Alliance. I look forward to developing these professional relationships over the next several years with CIOR.”

Capt Dr. Aaron Petty, 37, USA, Army

Mix of military and academic thinking

What sets this seminar apart among CIOR events is the mix of military and academic thinking on strategically relevant topics. Young reserve officers may be more concerned with tactical matters, but this serves as an eye-opener, setting a much wider context for our actions.

It is also an excellent networking opportunity, and I appreciate the fact that some time is reserved for social activities, enabling us to know each other.

Last but not least, the Gustav Stresemann Institute (GSI) is a perfect setting for this recurring event, as it provides comfort and focus, while also being reasonably close to the centre of Bonn.

2Lt Catalin Florea, Romania

-Gives a 360 degree understanding

“The conference is the perfect opportunity to dive into a current topic. The excellent speakers each elaborate on their own speciality and this allows you as a conference attendee to get a 360 degrees understanding of the topic.

Next, the conference is a perfect opportunity to meet new people from different countries sharing the same interest: being a reserve officer. So if you have the opportunity to attend the conference, I would highly recommend it!”

Lt Desi Van Der Laar, 33, The Netherlands, Air Force

-A great way to learn more about NATO’s strategic concerns

“The CIOR seminar is a great way to learn more about NATO’s strategic concerns. Expert speakers, good workshops and interesting debates. I highly recommend it.”

Lt Reitze Wellen, 34, The Netherlands, Army

Photo gallery by Lt Col Bill Grieve (R), US Army and 2nd Lt Catalin Florea, Romanian Air Force/CIOR Public Affairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Seminar 2020” launched in Bonn

The CIOR Seminar 2020 opened in Bonn Saturday morning, with over 50 participants from 13 nations.

Among many European countries represented were also Australia, South Africa and the USA. The theme for this year’s Seminar is “China – Threat or Opportunity?”, with a distinguished panel of very high calibre speakers. The audience spans from young reserve officers to CIOR Vice Presidents (heads of national delegations) and military staff specialists.

Have a look at this presentation video!

For more on the 2020 CIOR Seminar, click here!

 

CIOR Mid-Winter Meeting opened at NATO HQ

The Mid-Winter Meeting (MWM) of CIOR opened this morning at NATO headquarters in Brussels.

By Roy Thorvaldsen, Lt Col Norwegian Army/ CIOR Public Affairs and Major Jean-Francois Lambert, Canadian Armed Forces/ CIOR Public Affairs (Photo).

The two and a half day meeting started with an opening session in the auditorium of the “new” headquarters building at Boulevard Leopold III.

CIOR Secretary General, Colonel Adrian Walton, opened the show before President, Colonel (R) Chris Argent updated the audience on last year’s progress towards the organisation’s goals and objectives.

The annual winter meeting helps shape the second half of the work year prior to the 2020 Summer Congress.

There was also an introductory session in which CIOR and it’s sister organisation CIOMR (for medical reserve officers) presented themselves to each others attendees.

The CIOR Council and the various committees then went to work on their respective programs of work.

CIOR President, Colonel (R) Chris Argent opening the mid-winter meeting in Brussels.
The CIOR President briefing on the progress towards the organisation’s goals and objectives.
CIOMR President, Major (R) Sylvano Ferracani and CIOMR Secretary General, Brigadier General (R) Francois R. Martelet.

Romanian Reserve Officer Association awarded by President of Romania

The Romanian Reserve Officers Association (AORR) has been awarded by the President of Romania with the Memorial Medal “Centenary of the War for National Unity”.

The Romanian Reserve Officers Association (AORR) was recently awarded the Memorial Medal “Centenary of the War for National Unity” by the President of Romania, HE Klaus Johannis, at the Cotroceni Palace. AORR was represented by its president, Lt. Gen. (R) dr. Virgil Bălăceanu, the current Secretary Geeneral, Brig. Gen. (R) Iulian Burticioiu and the former, Maj. Gen. (R) dr. Dan Grecu.

The event brought together several military and civilian institutions, supporters of the Romanian military tradition, which all received recognition for their merits.

– The gratitude of the State of Romania

– By awarding the medals “Centenary of the War for National Unity” I wish to express the gratitude of the State of Romania for the sacrifice enacted by the generation of the Great Union on the battlefield of the War for National Unity, stated the Romanian President in his speech.

Major project

One of the major projects of AORR, in the year of the Centenary of the Great Union (2018), was the development of the Mobile Expo-Memorial Complex

“Glory to the Romanian Soldier” is dedicated to those heroes who sacrificed themselves in World War I. Being materialised as an impressive structure, the Expo-Memorial complex serves as historic testimony, heroes memorial, homage to the Romanian Armed Forces and public history lesson.

The monument was inaugurated on November 30th, 2018 in the city of Alba Iulia and it measures 23 meters in height, same as the Monument of the National Union, unveiled at the same historic place and time. This ambitious project wouldn’t have been possible without the support of the Ministry of Culture and National Identity, as well as the European Association “Dimitrie Cantemir”.

An active player at the intersection of military life and society

At the same time, AORR has been an active player at the intersection of the military life and society, involved in several actions, including: a Workshop concerning National Defense readjustment, in cooperation with the Romanian Defence Staff and the National Defense University “Carol I”; a Public Debate in partnership with the Committee for Defence, Public Order and National Security from the Chamber of Deputies, regarding the status of the Romanian Armed Forces and the necessity of developing Reserve Forces/Territorial Forces; active involvement in the program for the recruitment and training of voluntary reservists.

International Eexperts’ conference

The most recent large-scale project of AORR was the International Experts’ Conference SECDEF19, in partnership with the Military Technical Academy “Ferdinand I”, the Romanian Business Association of the Military Technique Manufacturers – PATROMIL and academic institutions from Poland.

At the Cotroceni Palace, the Romanian Reserve Officers Association (AORR) was recently awarded the Memorial Medal “Centenary of the War for National Unity” by the President of Romania, HE Klaus Johannis. AORR was represented by its president, Lt. Gen. (R) dr. Virgil Bălăceanu, the current Secretary Geeneral, Brig. Gen. (R) Iulian Burticioiu and the former, Maj. Gen. (R) dr. Dan Grecu.

Link to Romanian Reserve Officer Association with a video of the above event at the bottom of the page here.

From the construction of the monument “Glory to the Romanian Soldier”.

The monument “Glory to the Romanian Soldier”.
From the construction of the monument “Glory to the Romanian Soldier”.

 Link to Romanian Reserve Officer Association with a video of the above event at the bottom of the page here.

Spanish Reserve Association with Parliament seminar on NATO Reserves

Spain’s Reserve Forces Association FORE (Federación de Organizaciones de Reservistas de España) recently held a seminar in the Parliament in Madrid, on NATO’s Reserve Forces. The seminar was well attended by members of Parliament – amongst whom a substantial number are either serving or past members of Spain’s Armed Forces – and by the responsible people for the Reserve management of the Ministry of Defense and the Army.

The proceedings were opened by Pedro Argüelles Salaverría, a former member of the Spanish and European parliaments, former Vice Minister of Defense and President of the Asociación Atlántica Espanola. He stressed the ongoing need for Reservists.

Key-note speaker from NATO HQ

essing NATO Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Public Diplomacy, Ms. Carmen Romero, referring a question to CIOR President Colonel (Retd.) Chris Argent, UK Army during the Q&A session.

The key-note speaker was Ms. Carmen Romero, NATO Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Public Diplomacy, who gave a broad overview of current key issues in NATO. She briefed on the wide range of current threats to peace and security in the Alliance’s area of interest, and the challenges that come with emerging technologies falling into the “wrong hands”.

Ms Romero stressed that whilst there were, as always, tensions within the Alliance, all member nations agree that NATO is ’’better together’’ and remains a bulwark for peace in the free world.

Case studies

Four reservists, Florentien Braat from the Netherlands, John Carolan-Cullion from the UK, Ronny Vossen from Denmark and Francisco Muñoyerro from Spain then presented their own experiences on operational tours in Bosnia-Hercegovina, Afghanistan and Turkey – covering a wide spectrum of military skills and environments.

CIOR President, Colonel (Retd) Chris Argent UK Army addressing the seminar attendees.

 

ARRC with good Reservist experiences

Brigadier General Melchor Marin Elvira reported on the increasing role for Reservists both in training and on operations within the General Staff of the Allied Rapid Reaction Corps (ARRC) of NATO, and spoke positively of his experiences with Reservists as a valuable component in the Headquarters.

CIOR President in Q&A session

The Seminar concluded with a Question and Answer Session chaired by Luis Placencia, FORE President, which was joined by Colonel Chris Argent, President of CIOR, who in turn spoke of his own experiences over many years as a Reserve Infantry Officer in the UK Army.

Speakers and panelists at the Reserve Seminar in the Spanish Parliament, including CIOR President Colonel (UK Army Retd) Chris Argent to the far left.
Group photo with participating speakers and panelists at the Reserve Seminar in the Spanish Parliament.

Estonian ‘snap exercise’ for over 800 Reservists

The Estonian government last week decided to invite on short notice 823 armed forces Reservists to an additional training exercise, ‘Okas 2019’. Members of the 61st Combat Service Support Battalion were required to rush to rally points specified in their invites.

TALLINN, Estonia, October 23rd, 2019 (Text & photo: Estonian Defence Forces)

Okas 2019 is a readiness exercise with a purpose to test the chain of command from the decision of the Estonian government to the gathering of Reservists in their units. There is no immediate threat to Estonian security in the scenario.

Members of the 61st Combat Service Support Battalion were required to rush to rally points specified in their invites for last week’s exercise.

The mission of the Estonian Defence Forces (EDF) is to be ready for different scenarios, including these that are very unlikely to happen. EDF is ready to defend Estonia and is practicing it during exercises.

Efficient and viable deterrent measure

The Estonian national security concept is based on Reserve service that has proved itself to be an efficient and viable deterrent measure. The reason for this kind of peacetime exercises is to maintain and improve rapid reaction capabilities.

Being equipped right is an important part of getting ready to fight! From last week’s Reservist exercise in Estonia.

Snap exercises for Reservists at least once a year

EDF is inviting reservists regularly to different military training exercises on a longer 120-days-notice. Snap exercises have been carried out since 2016 at least once or twice a year.

Almost 80 percent of the Reservists who received the invitation, showed up. Some of them arrived to their units from places all over Europe where they work or study.

– Eighty percent response rate shows motivation to defend country

„The high numbers of reservists who immediately responded to the the call, shows that our Reservists are motivated to defend their country,“ Major General Indrek Sirel, Deputy Chief of Defence said.

For more photos from last week’s snap Reservist exercise in Estonia click here.

CIOR – UKRFA Summit on Norfolk Broads, East Anglia

CIOR President, UK Col Chris Argent (Retd.), the President designate, German Navy Captain Jan Hormann (R) and President of the UKRFA, Major General Greg Smith.

The CIOR President, UK Colonel Chris Argent (Retd.) and president designate German Navy Captain Jan Hormann (R) this week met with the President of the United Kingdom Reserve Forces Association/UKRFA, Major General Greg Smith. The summit took place on the Norfolk Broads in East Anglia, UK.

The topics discussed included CIOR both in the UK presidential term and in the upcoming German one, to ensure a smooth transfer from one presidency to the next.

The conversation also included the continuation of the various strategic developments of the confederation, the CIOR President’s upcoming presentation to the NATO Military Committee in Brussels on 7 October and the forthcoming autumn meeting (IBM) in Edinburgh, Scotland 24 to 27 November.

CIOR Language Academy precursor to Summer Congress

The CIOR Summer Congress takes place 4-10 August in Tallinn, Estonia. The forerunner has been the CIOR Language Academy (CLA). The CLA held classes in French and English from July 20 to August 4, at the Estonian Academy of Security Sciences in Tallinn.

Photo by: MajorJean-François Lambert​, CIOR Public Affairs Committee, Canadian Armed Forces.

The CIOR Language Academy (CLA) teaches English and French as a second language, emphasizing a NATO military lexicon while at the same time providing an orientation to CIOR. The instructors, qualified reserve officers as well as skilled linguists and teachers, are provided by CIOR member nations and are selected through a competitive process.

The students are NATO reserve officers and active duty officers of the new democracies of Eastern and Central Europe. Through the Language Academy, they are provided an essential and indispensable tool to carry out international NATO business – the ability to communicate in one of NATO’s two official languages. Established in 2000, CLA was a CIOR initiative in support of the Partnership for Peace program and has matriculated more than 300 officers from every nation of Eastern and Central Europe.

Photo by: MajorJean-François Lambert​, CIOR Public Affairs Committee, Canadian Armed Forces.

CIOR Language Academy is open to Reserve Officers or Active Officers below 60 years of age. NCOs, civilians with military affiliations and Retired Officers will have lower priority according to availability.

For more about CLA, click here.

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